Child Custody Resources Southampton

Child custody is a major issue that divorcing couples need to deal with and it can be contentious if the two parties cannot compromise. If you're going through a divorce and there are children involved, make sure you know your rights as a parent and learn about ways to come to agreements that suit all parties, particularly the children. Continue reading to learn more about child custody resources and get information on local companies and providers that will help you in your search.

Blake Lapthorn
023 80631823
21 Brunswick Place
Southampton
Christopher Green Mccarrahers
023 80632733
2-5 College Place
Southampton
Bernard Chill & Axtell
023 80228821
24 The Avenue
Southampton
Lawcomm Solicitors
023 80233708
Bellevue House
Southampton
Dent Abrams
023 80223726
17 College Place
Southampton
D Wills
023 80221221
6-8 St Michaels Street
Southampton
Sharman & Co
023 80480007
9 Carlton Place
Southampton
Lamport Bassitt Ltd
023 80837777
46 The Avenue
Southampton
Corporate Legal
08454 589448
151 High Street
Southampton
Trethowans Solicitors
023 80321000
Director Generals House
Southampton
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Child Custody Advice, Help & Information

Child Custody & Residence Advice

Custody/Residence

No orders regarding children are automatically made on divorce. You must file a 'Statement of Arrangements' detailing agreements about what will happen with the children - where they will live, contact arrangements, which school they will attend etc. You can get these forms from your local court and complete them yourself or with the help of a solicitor . Both parties must sign the form.

If agreement can not be reached you can apply to the court to resolve the issue where they will make decisions based on the welfare of the child.

The court can make these orders and the following terminology is used:

  • A Residence Order (previously known as Custody) - where and with whom a child will live.
  • A Contact Order (previously known as an Access Order) - this states who should be allowed contact with the child.
  • Prohibited Steps Order - this order prevents specific actions in relation to a child, for example taking them from the country.
  • Specific Issue Order - this relates to a specific issue for a child such as schooling.

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