Will Execution Resources Cwmbran

A person's last will and testament should be executed exactly as the deceased would have wished, and generally an executor of the estate is named to ensure that this happens. The executor can be a family member, friend, lawyer or other trusted advisor who will be faithful to the person's wishes. Below you’ll find related articles as well as local companies and providers that will help you in your search.

Parry Davies Clwyd Jones & Lloyd
01286 673381
2A Bridge Street
Caernarfon
Keith Picken
029 20755550
63 Lakeside Drive
Cardiff
Anthony Jeremy & May Solicitors
029 20764469
14 Cefn Coed Road
Cardiff
Evans Company
029 20790800
733B Newport Road
Cardiff
Harrisons
01938 552545
11 Berriew Street
Welshpool
Probert & Gray
01639 643501
21 Victoria Gardens
Neath
David W Harris & Co
01443 486666
24-25 Gelliwastad Road
Pontypridd
Malloy & Barry Solicitors
029 20343434
194 Cowbridge Road East
Cardiff
Strick & Bellingham
01792 641201
2 Princess Way
Swansea
Freed Kemp Rapport
029 20222685
19 St. Andrews Cr
Cardiff
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Executing a Will

Executing the Will

Executing a Will | Responsibilities of the Executor of a Will The terms of any valid will must be adhered to. It is the role of the executor to ensure that the will is carried out as specified.

You may have been asked to be an executor for someone but not know what that role entails. It may be that after someone dies you find out you are an executor and have no idea where to start. Here is an overview of what being an executor means.
  • An executor is a person or company (such as a bank or firm of solicitors) named in a will to carry out or execute the wishes of the deceased and distribute the estate upon death. In England and Wales a person must be at least 18 to be an executor.
  • The role of executor is a complex and often time consuming one.
  • There may be up to a maximum of 4 executors and this is often the case where there may be disagreements over the estate.
  • If you have not been named but wish to act as executor you can apply for an administrative grant to the Probate Registry .
  • If you are an executor then this is for life – claims can come up in the future and you should be able to deal with them. If at any point you feel you can no longer act in the role then you must inform the Probate Registry in writing.
  • The executor has a list of tasks they are legally obliged to carry out. Here is a checklist and more information .
  • If at any point you are struggling with the legal or financial implications then you can contact your local CAB , or contact a local solicitor or financial advisor .
If you need help and support from other people who are experiencing the same issues as you then go to our forum .

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Executor's Checklist

Executor of a Will's Checklist

If you are acting as executor then it is likely that your involvement may go on for several months and possibly even years.

Part of an executor’s duties include drawing up some simple accounts providing all the details of how the deceased’s estate has been divided. This information will also be needed to enable any necessary tax return to be completed. The executor must also:
  • Inform next of kin, close family and any potential heirs of the death and that you are an executor.

  • Appoint a solicitor.

  • Obtain copy of will and carry out instructions within.

  • If necessary, register the death and assist with funeral arrangements.

  • Ensure assets are listed and if necessary made secure, for example, locating house keys and locking property.

  • Gather together vital paperwork, address book of deceased, wills, death certificate and any certified copies, personal effects such as handbag or wallet.

  • Gather all financial paperwork such as cheque books, bank statements, paying in books, credit card details, building society books, mortgage details and any cash.

  • Locate life insurance policies and paperwork such as membership forms, shares and stocks, bonds and pension information.

  • Find all household bills including those that are unpaid.

  • Collect together all tax records. At this stage do not dispose of things such as business related paperwork, tax records, wage slips etc even if they appear to be out of date.

  • If the deceased person is a business owner you will need all paperwork relating to the business including VAT records and accounts.

  • Gather details of professional advisors such as accountants, solicitors etc.

  • Check if probate is needed. When someone dies, a person must deal with their estate by collecting in money owed, paying debts and dividing the estate. In probate, a legal document is issued to a person to allow them to do this. As executor you may carry out this role. This document is issued by the probate registry and it is known as a Grant of Representation. If you receive this document make sure you have several certified copies.

  • Complete a tax return if needed.

  • With advice, consider inheritance tax issues.

  • Pay off any outstanding debts.

  • If you need to locate potential heirs or creditors then advertise in local/national papers.

  • Distribute the contents of the will.

Executors should set up an account solely for the purpose of dealing with the estate so that any money paid to the estate is easy to see. If you have no experience of the preparation of accounts then you have a duty to delegate this task to someone with the requisite experience.

Here are some useful spreadsheets to...

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