Therapists and Depression Resources Belfast

Depression affects many people--men and women, young and old--and one part of treating depression involves therapy. Therapists can help clients get to the root of the cause of depression and give them advice on how to cope with daily issues. Continue reading to learn more about therapists and depression resources and get information on local companies and providers that will help you in your search.

Lamp Group
028 90242982
Alpha House
Belfast
Belfast Counselling Group
028 9752 1854
224 Lisburn Road
Belfast
Fpani Counselling Service
028 9032 5488
113 University Street
Belfast
Times Of Refreshing Ministries
028 9045 8472
265 Woodstock Road
Belfast
Mothers Hope Crisis Centre
028 9023 5617
11 Hopewell Avenue
Belfast
Old See House
028 90370668
603 Antrim Road
Belfast
Republican Sinn Fein Office
028 9031 9004
229 Falls Road
Belfast
New Life
028 9039 1630
25a Ardoyne Road
Belfast
Restore
028 9027 8191
31 Carlisle Circus
Belfast
Citizens Advice Bureau
028 9084 4592
3b Ballyclare Road
Newtownabbey
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Coping with Depression

Coping with Depression from Grief or Bereavement

Coping with Depression | Mental Illness From Grief & Mourning Depression after bereavement is very common. A study by Zisook in 1993 looked at the rate of depression in late-life widows. The results showed that 16 per cent of them had depression 13 months after bereavement. About 15 percent of people will have a bout of major depression at some point in their lives.

The type of depression after a death is often called reactive depression as it is response to an event. Depression is more than feeling a bit sad or blue. It is a real illness that has a range of symptoms including physical manifestations such as headaches and raised blood pressure as well as emotional feelings such as being unable to function on a day to day level.

Depression is very treatable and the first step is identifying whether you have depression. There are common symptoms of depression:

Psychological symptoms:
  • continuous low / blue mood or sadness.
  • feelings of hopelessness and helplessness.
  • low self-esteem.
  • tearfulness.
  • feelings of guilt.
  • feeling irritable and intolerance of others.
  • lack of motivation, and little interest in and difficulty making decisions.
  • lack of enjoyment.
  • suicidal thoughts / thoughts of harming someone else.
  • feeling anxious or worried.
  • reduced sex drive.
Physical symptoms:
  • slowed movement / speech.
  • change in appetite / weight (usually decreased but sometimes increased).
  • constipation.
  • unexplained aches and pains.
  • lack of energy / lack of interest in sex.
  • changes to the menstrual cycle.
Social symptoms:
  • not performing well at work.
  • taking part in fewer social activities and avoiding contact with friends.
  • reduced hobbies and interests, and difficulties in home and family life.
There are many approaches to the treatment of depression including medication, talking therapies and self help. Some people choose not to treat their depression but by getting help you can avoid unnecessary emotional pain. The best place to start is with your GP who can talk through the options with you.
  • Medication. People often fear they will become ‘hooked’ on medication. The main aim of medication is to allow you to resume day to day activities and begin to cope again. It rarely resolves the underlying issues and feelings. Medication can take up to a month to begin to work and sometimes you have to try several different kinds to find the one that suits you. Anti-depressants are not addictive but if you choose to come off them it is best to do so in a controlled way.

  • Counselling. This is when you tend to work one on one with a counsellor and they help you to talk through your feelings. Counselling isn’t an overnight remedy. You need to find a counsellor who you trust and can talk openly with.

  • Support of friends and family. There is still a huge stigma attached to depression and mental health in general but it is just an illness like ...

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