Therapists and Depression Resources Portsmouth

Depression affects many people--men and women, young and old--and one part of treating depression involves therapy. Therapists can help clients get to the root of the cause of depression and give them advice on how to cope with daily issues. Continue reading to learn more about therapists and depression resources and get information on local companies and providers that will help you in your search.

Employment Works
023 92732965
117 Orchard Road
Southsea
Mild Professional Care Ltd
01329 242330
Knightsbridge House 19
Fareham
Abbotts Lodge
023 80453562
Abbey Hill
Southampton
Marcella House
023 80841341
Jones Lane
Southampton
Morris House Nhs
023 80233121
71-73 Morris Road
Southampton
Isle Of Wight Healthcare Nhs Trust
01983 811568
Milligan House
Ryde
West Wight Community Mental Health Team
01983 525254
29-31 Pyle Street
Newport
Centurion Mental Health Centre
01243 791900
Graylingwell Drive
Chichester
Bay Tree House
023 80795354
Graham Road
Southampton
Mad About Enterprises
023 80330001
Bedford House
Southampton
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Coping with Depression

Coping with Depression from Grief or Bereavement

Coping with Depression | Mental Illness From Grief & Mourning Depression after bereavement is very common. A study by Zisook in 1993 looked at the rate of depression in late-life widows. The results showed that 16 per cent of them had depression 13 months after bereavement. About 15 percent of people will have a bout of major depression at some point in their lives.

The type of depression after a death is often called reactive depression as it is response to an event. Depression is more than feeling a bit sad or blue. It is a real illness that has a range of symptoms including physical manifestations such as headaches and raised blood pressure as well as emotional feelings such as being unable to function on a day to day level.

Depression is very treatable and the first step is identifying whether you have depression. There are common symptoms of depression:

Psychological symptoms:
  • continuous low / blue mood or sadness.
  • feelings of hopelessness and helplessness.
  • low self-esteem.
  • tearfulness.
  • feelings of guilt.
  • feeling irritable and intolerance of others.
  • lack of motivation, and little interest in and difficulty making decisions.
  • lack of enjoyment.
  • suicidal thoughts / thoughts of harming someone else.
  • feeling anxious or worried.
  • reduced sex drive.
Physical symptoms:
  • slowed movement / speech.
  • change in appetite / weight (usually decreased but sometimes increased).
  • constipation.
  • unexplained aches and pains.
  • lack of energy / lack of interest in sex.
  • changes to the menstrual cycle.
Social symptoms:
  • not performing well at work.
  • taking part in fewer social activities and avoiding contact with friends.
  • reduced hobbies and interests, and difficulties in home and family life.
There are many approaches to the treatment of depression including medication, talking therapies and self help. Some people choose not to treat their depression but by getting help you can avoid unnecessary emotional pain. The best place to start is with your GP who can talk through the options with you.
  • Medication. People often fear they will become ‘hooked’ on medication. The main aim of medication is to allow you to resume day to day activities and begin to cope again. It rarely resolves the underlying issues and feelings. Medication can take up to a month to begin to work and sometimes you have to try several different kinds to find the one that suits you. Anti-depressants are not addictive but if you choose to come off them it is best to do so in a controlled way.

  • Counselling. This is when you tend to work one on one with a counsellor and they help you to talk through your feelings. Counselling isn’t an overnight remedy. You need to find a counsellor who you trust and can talk openly with.

  • Support of friends and family. There is still a huge stigma attached to depression and mental health in general but it is just an illness like ...

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