Bereavement Counselling for Children Crewe

Death is especially hard for children to understand and when a child loses a loved one it can be hard for the adults around them to know how to explain what has happened. Bereavement counselling for children can help young people find ways to understand and cope with their feelings and find ways to adapt to life without a parent or loved one. Continue reading to learn more about bereavement counselling for children and get information on local companies and providers that will help you in your search.

South Cheshire Community Council
01270 252600
Imperial Chambers
Crewe
Greenleaves Mental Health Support Service
01270 761655
Crewe Road
Sandbach
Lyme Brook Mental Health Centre
01782 425350
Bradwell Hospital Site
Newcastle
Denton House Mental Health Resource Centre
01606 353800
Denton Drive
Northwich
North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare
01782 427650
Clydesdale House
Stoke On Trent
Eaton House Mental Health Resource Centre
01270 506700
Eaton House
Crewe
Field House Mental Health Resouce Centre
01270 752100
Field House
Sandbach
Ashlands Mental Health Resource Centre
01782 427470
35 North Street
Newcastle
North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare N H S Trust
01782 425171
The Bennett Centre
Stoke On Trent
Combined Healthcare
01782 427432
Hilton Road
Stoke On Trent
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Helping Bereaved Children

Supporting a Bereaved Child

Helping Bereaved Children | Coping with the Death of a Parent Children need special attention and support when they are bereaved. For a child the loss of a parent or sibling can be completely overwhelming.

The loss of your wife, husband or partner is devastating and is recognised as the most stressful life event. It can be additionally harrowing if you are struggling with your own emotions and you also need to support your child in dealing with their emotions when their world has turned upside down.

How do you begin to deal with the situation?
  • The age of your child will have an effect on how they respond to the death and their level of understanding.

  • It is important that you explain as honestly as you can what has happened but you will need to tailor this to your child’s level of understanding. The aim is not to scare children but to give them information. Children have very active imaginations and see and hear more than we give them credit for. They need you to explain what has really happened and to put it into context in their world.

  • Don’t forget children grieve too. Ask them what they need and want and how they feel. They may want to come to the funeral; they may have their own special way of saying goodbye or remembering.

  • Don’t expect children to react the way you would. Children don’t have the same emotional spectrum or coping skills that adults do and they may exhibit some very extreme behaviour – if you are concerned discuss it with your GP but expect ongoing changes which you will have to support them through.

  • If you are struggling to cope then get help, from both friends and family and from a wider support network of healthcare professionals.

  • Explain to those around you that your child has experienced a death; this may include close friends.

  • It is important to inform playgroups or school to ensure that allowances are made and that any emotional distress or unusual behaviour can be picked up and support offered.

You can find extra help and support here:

BBC - Helping Bereaved Children

Childhood Bereavement Network

Winston’s Wish

Cruse Bereavement's Youth Project

Child Bereavement Trust

The Compassionate Friends

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