Family Law Information: Court Orders & Maintenance Southampton

Child support, or child maintenance, is a major issue in family law and divorce proceedings. Before you head to court, make sure you're in the know about different court orders and child maintenance payment issues that could come up in your case. Read through the following articles to learn more about court orders and maintenance and find local companies and providers who can help you find what you’re looking for.

Blake Lapthorn
023 80631823
21 Brunswick Place
Southampton
Christopher Green Mccarrahers
023 80632733
2-5 College Place
Southampton
Bernard Chill & Axtell
023 80228821
24 The Avenue
Southampton
Lawcomm Solicitors
023 80233708
Bellevue House
Southampton
Dent Abrams
023 80223726
17 College Place
Southampton
D Wills
023 80221221
6-8 St Michaels Street
Southampton
Sharman & Co
023 80480007
9 Carlton Place
Southampton
Lamport Bassitt Ltd
023 80837777
46 The Avenue
Southampton
Corporate Legal
08454 589448
151 High Street
Southampton
Trethowans Solicitors
023 80321000
Director Generals House
Southampton
Data Provided by:
 

Court Orders & Maintenance

Court Orders & Maintenance

In the early 90's, the Government introduced the Child Support Agency and most of the issues relating to child maintenance passed from the courts to the CSA. The CSA is likely to be disbanded in the future but details of its replacement have not yet been released. In the meantime existing procedures are still in place.

The courts now only make maintenance orders for children in limited circumstances:

  • Where the parents both apply to the court for an 'order by consent'
  • Where a child is in full-time education and there are school fees to pay
  • Where a child is undergoing vocational training or an apprenticeship and there are expenses to pay
  • Where a child is disabled, and there are care costs
  • Where the other parent lives abroad on a permanent basis

The Child Support Agency (CSA)

In most cases the CSA deals with maintenance for children. They accept applications from parents with care (those who live with children), non-resident parents (those who are not living with the children), and other people caring for qualifying children (such as grandparents) if all the people involved live in the UK.

If the father (or mother) refuses to pay, or makes excuses then the CSA has a responsibility to take action, usually via the courts.

Since March 2003 new laws governing the way child support is calculated have been implemented. Briefly, absent fathers will be required to pay 15% of their net income for a single child, 20% for two and 25% for three children or more. The maximum income that will be taken into account will be capped at £2,000 net income a week. If the father has a new family then similar allowances will be made for each child in his second family, including stepchildren. Rates of 15%, 20% and 25% will be deducted from the non-resident parent's net income and only the balance will be subject to the standard rates for the first family.

Those who don't or won't pay risk losing their driving licence and if they lie or refuse to provide information, they could be fined up to £1,000. Late payments will also lead to fines.

The income of the resident mother is not be taken into consideration, nor is that of a new partner. So, the lone mother could earn huge amounts each year and still demand, and be entitled to, up to 25% of the absent father's income. Equally, the father could be a millionaire with a vast income but will never be required to pay more than £26,000 a year even if he can afford much more.

The CSA website has full details on applying for child maintenance and calculating the amount you may receive.


Click here to read the rest of this article from Newton Mearns

What: Where: